Brain Science for Writers 11/25/14

Happy Thanksgiving week!  BTW, I'm closing down my Facebook page because of Facebook's continuing changing policies regarding Pages.  If you'd like to keep following me on facebook, please friend me at my personal author account here.

Top Pick: A really interesting article speculating in why smells are hard to name

Synchronized Walking Reduces Opponent's Perceived Size. This makes me think about ways synchronized movements can be used to show character relationships.

Interesting article about how Americans and Germans differ in their framing of grief.

More tips from Harvard psychologist Steven Pinker on how to be a good writer.

War really does foster a band of brothers.

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Brain Science for Writers Roundup 11/18/14

Brain Science for Writers is a periodic roundup featuring psychology articles of interest to writers.

Featured: Afraid asking for advice will make you look incompetent? Apparently asking for advice actually increases other peoples' opinion of you.

How sharing a toilet helps students make more friends.

Steven Pinker gives a psycholinguistic perspective on what makes good writing.

Is kindness physically attractive?

How does the psychology of ownership differ between western and eastern cultures?

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Brain Science for Writers Roundup 11/11/14

Brain Science for Writers is a periodic roundup features psychology articles of interest to writers.

Featured: An interesting analysis of how language has changed in certain films and movies over time.

Featured:  Ancient campfires led to the rise of storytelling.

Five biggest mistakes when writing mental illnesses.

How reminders of money affect people's expression and perception of emotion

Using literature to cope with grief.

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Marketing My Traditionally Pubbed Novel With a Self Pubbed Novella: Lessons and Observations


My debut novel Midnight Thief come out with Disney-Hyperion in July 2014. My primary strategy for marketing this novel was to self publish a prequel novella called Poison Dance in September 2013, about 10 months before the novel’s release. Now that it’s a few months after launch, I’m finally in a position to talk about what I did, what worked, what didn’t, etc. (And also, I’m taking Poison Dance off permafree in early December, so grab it now.)


Brain Science For Writers Roundup 11/4/2014

Brain Science for Writers Roundup is a periodic feature of relevant psychology articles for writers.

Featured: Great article about how diversity makes us smarter and better at our jobs

Featured: A fascinating article about the links between smell and emotion. Are you using smell imagery in your narratives?

Interesting article on how people view the victims of infidelity.

Apparently making eye contact makes us more aware of our own bodies.

Classifying city layouts. For you worldbuilders put there.



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Brain Science for Writers Roundup 10/3/14


Happy October! By the way, I recently published a short story at Inscription Magazine.  You can read it for free here.

And on to the brain science articles...

Does going on vacation make you more creative? (via Passive Guy)

Dogs get jealous.

Not surprisingly, the way you describe a crime and a criminal will affect how harshly the criminal is judged.

An interesting article on how one's propensity to feel disgust predicts one's political inclinations.

And finally, a mathematical equation to predict happiness.

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Brain Science for Writers Roundup 9/26/14

Brain Science for Writers roundups are sporadic collections of psychology and neuroscience articles that I find to be interesting and/or useful for writers. 

Featured Link: An awesome map of where emotions are felt in the body.

We use the same brain regions to process physical, emotional, and abstract distance.

Reading a story can change how you perceive yourself, but only if you're highly engaged in it.

Everybody wants to be happy, right?  Not at all.  In fact, many cultures fear or avoid happiness.

Need to improve reading comprehension?  Try acting it out.

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